Saturday 18 February 2023

Magdeburg Hussar Regiment, Number 10.

This regiment started life as the volunteer Elbe National Hussar Regiment (although in popular terms they were known as the Green Hussars from Aschersleben after their green coats and the town where they assembled). Forming in November 1813 they did not participate in the Campaign in Germany, but in the 1814 campaign they served at the Siege of Magdeburg.

In May of 1815 the regiment was transferred to the Prussian standing army with the title of Magdeburg Hussar Regiment, Number 10. They participated in the 100 days campaign, but were not engaged at either Ligny or Waterloo.

In 1816 they were presented with their colours, but lost the title Magdeburg.

In the revolts of 1848 they were sent first to Magdeburg then to Hesse and the disturbances in both were resolved without bloodshed. The title Magdeburg was returned to the regiment in 1860. In 1866 the regiment earned distinction at Munchengratz, Gitchin, Koniggratz and Pressburg.

In 1870 their only notable action was at Mars-La-Tour where they participated, along with the Brunswick Hussars,  in the great cavalry battle north of that place.

Elements of the regiment went to China in 1900 as a part of the Boxer expedition and a detachment was sent to East Africa in 1903 to help quell disturbances there.


Initially deployed to the Western Front in 1914, they were dismounted  in 1916 and some squadrons were posted to the Eastern Front. While most of the squadrons were disbanded in early-1919, two were retained as volunteers to defend against Polish insurgents, but then disbanded in 1920.




The colour of the busby bag and the wolf tooth edge of the shabraque for the regiment was Madder Red (sometimes called Pompadour Red). What did that mean? This set me off on a search to see what colour Madder Red actually was and it made for an interesting find for me. The colour has origins back to 1500 BC and was evident in Egyptian and Asian civilisations. Derived from the common madder plant it is an organic or lake pigment known a Madder Lake that has a pinkish-magenta hue. For those familiar with colour specs they are: RGB 227,38, 54 or CMYK 12,92,70,2).


10 comments:

  1. Another regimental name that is familiar to me. Great work Mark and it is nice to see these familiar names come to life. I never knew that about the Madder Red. I purchased the Foundry version but thought the name was just an affectation that they had given it.

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    1. Thanks Lawrence. I am working on the last of the hussars now, about half way through.it is a very similar unit with a unique feature. Yes the Madder Red is an odd blend, but quite a nice colour to work with.

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  2. They look spiffing Mark. I have heard of both Madder and Pompadour red but have never investigated the origins of the names!

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    1. That is hussar regiment number five for this army and number 21 across all my collections. I did French AWI unit in Pompadour Red some time last year.

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  3. Great looking hussar regiment! I always thought madder red was a dull red. I learned a lot on madder history. Thanks!

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    1. Thanks Jonathan. I’m not sure I got the colour totally correct, but it is distinctly different to the unit I am doing now with the strong red details.

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    1. Thanks Stew. I had finished all but three figures when I realised that I had done the lace around the wolf tooth edging in white when it should have been yellow. So I had to revisit the first 9 figures 😖

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  5. Another lovely addition to your hussar portfolio Mark...
    All the best Aly

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    1. Thanks Aly. I finished the last figures for the final FPW hussar regiment last night and will post them a little later…I am pretty much hussared out for now!

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